Friday , 7 October 2022

Iran’s Morality Police Warn Clothesmakers To Avoid ‘Loud’ Colors Or Face Closure

RFL/RE – Iranian authorities have warned manufacturers and sellers of women’s clothing that they will shut down their businesses if they keep using “loud” colors in their products.

The news comes amid recent reports that Iranian authorities are increasingly cracking down on women deemed to be in violation of the country's dress code.

In a statement to the Roydad24 website, Majid Emami, who heads Iran’s fashion and clothing organization, quoted the Ministry of Industry and Trade as saying that women’s clothing manufacturers could lose the right to manufacture knee-length open cloaks — the Iranian women’s most common piece of clothing that is usually worn over a shirt and with long pants or jeans — unless they stick with colors not deemed to be “loud.”

“Regarding the color: the ministry emphasized that manufacturers should not use loud colors,” Emami said.

However, he said that “there is no order or regulation to clarify which colors are deemed illegal.”

Emami added that “society does not have a problem with this kind of clothing [knee-length open cloaks in bright colors].”

“If the relevant institutions want to create restrictions on the type of production, they should first change the taste of society,” Emami added.

The news comes amid recent reports that authorities in Iran are increasingly cracking down on women deemed to be in violation of wearing the hijab, which is mandatory in public in Iran.

In recent weeks, women judged not to be in compliance have been barred from government offices, banks, and public transportation.

The notorious Guidance Patrols, or morality police, have become increasingly active and violent. Videos have emerged on social media appearing to show officers detaining women, forcing them into vans, and whisking them away.

The hijab — the head covering worn by Muslim women — became compulsory in public for Iranian women and girls over the age of 9 after the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

Many Iranian women have flouted the rule over the years and pushed the boundaries of what officials say is acceptable clothing.

Written by Ardeshir Tayebi based on an original story in Persian by RFE/RL’s Radio Farda
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