Wednesday , 12 June 2024

EU Urges Iran To ‘Reverse Nuclear Trajectory’ As Tehran Threatens To Cross Threshold

RFL/RE – The European Union has joined the United States and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in urging Iran to abandon suggestions that it might develop nuclear weapons.

“We continue to call Iran to reverse its nuclear trajectory and show concrete steps, such as urgently improve cooperation with the IAEA,” EU spokesman Peter Stano told RFE/RL in written comments on May 16.

The Islamic republic has long claimed that its nuclear program is strictly for civilian purposes, but a growing number of officials in recent weeks have openly suggested that Iran might review its nuclear doctrine if it deems it necessary.

A landmark deal known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) between Iran and world powers in 2015 restricted Tehran’s nuclear program in exchange for relief from sanctions.

However, Iran expanded its program and restricted IAEA inspections of its nuclear sites after then-President Donald Trump withdrew the United Staes from the deal and reimposed sanctions in 2018.

The EU, which is the coordinator of the JCPOA’s Joint Commission, mediated several rounds of indirect talks between Tehran and Washington from 2021 to 2022.

The 27-member bloc presented a final draft of an agreement to revive the deal in August 2022, but talks broke down soon after as Tehran and Washington accused each other of making excessive demands.

“Our goal has always been to stop Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons, through a diplomatic solution,” Stano said, adding that the EU’s foreign policy chief, Josep Borrell, and his team continue efforts to revive the Iran deal.SEE ALSO:Going Nuclear: Iran’s New Rhetorical Deterrence

Iran has particularly upped the rhetoric since last month, when it launched an unprecedented missile and drone attack against its archfoe Israel in response to a deadly air strike on its embassy compound in Syria that killed several members of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC).

An IRGC general at the time warned that an attack on Iran’s nuclear sites could lead to a rethinking of its policy on nuclear weapons.

Kamal Kharazi, a senior adviser to Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and a former foreign minister, repeated the threat earlier this week.

“We do not want nuclear weapons and the supreme leader’s fatwa is to that effect. But if the enemy threatens you, what do you do?” he said.

The fatwa refers to a religious decree by Khamenei in which he said the Islamic republic considers the use of nuclear weapons to be “haram” and Iran would not pursue one.

The fatwa has long been cited by the Iranian authorities as evidence that Iran would never weaponize its nuclear program. Experts, however, question how effective of a barrier the fatwa really is.

Farzan Sabet, a senior research associate at the Geneva Graduate Institute, said, “The nuclear fatwa does not pose an insurmountable religious or legal obstacle inside Iran for the system there to pursue nuclear weapons or potentially build them.”

Despite the public comments by Iranian officials, the Foreign Ministry has insisted that there has been no change in the country’s nuclear doctrine.

Stano said that it “is imperative to show utmost restraint” given the heightened tensions in the Middle East.

“Further escalation in the region — also in the form of statements about the nuclear posture, even if not reflecting the official position of the country — is in no one’s interest,” he added.

In response to in Iran’s new rhetoric, the United States has said it “will not allow” Tehran to obtain nuclear weapons.

Separately, IAEA Director-General Rafael Grossi has called on Iran to “stop” suggestions that it might review its nuclear posture.

0