Thursday , 23 September 2021

Several Unnamed ‘Corrupt’ Judges Dismissed In Iran

Radiofarda – The Prosecutor-General of the Islamic Republic announced on Thursday, October 31, that the judiciary has dismissed five to six “corrupt judges,” and the “battle” against “fraudulence” continues.

Mohammad Jafar Montazeri, who is notorious for not mincing his words, was not decided about the exact number of the “unnamed” judges convicted and sacked by the “Supreme Court.”

The mid-ranking clergy had announced on October 13 that five “corrupt” judges were dismissed and banned from serving in the public sector.

Reacting to Montazeri’s comments, President Hassan Rouhani’s senior advisor, Hessamoddin Ashena demanded in a tweet, “Name the dismissed unjust judges, and let people have the chance to file law suits against them.”

Earlier, the local news outlets had reported that “a number” of “dishonorable” judges, including Bijan Qassemzadeh, had been sacked from their positions.

Qassemzadeh was the presiding judge at the trial of the former President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s deputy (2001-2013), Hamid Baqaei (Baghaei).

After Ahmadinejad’s presidency ended in 2013, his aides became targets of the former Judiciary chief who apparently had a grudge against him.

Qassemzadeh was also the judge that ruled in favor of filtering the most popular social media messaging app, Telegram.

Since the appointment of Ebrahim Raeesi, as head of the judiciary in March 2019, reports on combating corruption have been rife in the local news outlets.

“Officials of the Judiciary will not allow corruption to nest in any location within the system, and on the agenda must be finding the best way to recognize these [corrupt] individuals,” Raeesi said back in August.

However, many analysts believe that the so-called combat against corruption is indeed a prelude to the next general elections in Iran.

The conservatives dominating Iran hope to regain the parliamentary majority they lost four years ago.

Iran’s next general election is set for February 21, 2020.

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